Man’s Best Friend Becomes #1 Dad at Mountfitchet Castle

Dogs are known for many things, from loyalty to protection. However, at Mountfitchet Castle in Essex England, one local canine has caught the attention of the world with his unexpected care of several non-human babies. Fred, a 10-year-old Labrador, has adopted nine ducklings.

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Indianapolis’ BLAK SUNDAY releases ‘Our War’ on Black Circle Records

“Our War” by BlaK SundaY

Fronted by Juan Blak, the 2019 release of BlaK SundaY’s “Our War” is a testament to the band’s progressive message and aggressive sound. With a with a run-time of four minutes, intersecting issues of racism, classism, and sexuality are confronted with courageous baritone vocals, steadfast lyricism, and an ensemble of postpunk and gothic rock attitude.

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Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In dialogues about human rights Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is often quoted. His place in American history is written throughout cities across the United States with streets, libraries and statues which honor the memory of a man who had been jailed, assaulted, and ultimately murdered. His words against the injustices of segregation and advocacy of nonviolent resistance have echoed across the pages of American history.

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The Pyramid by Sarama Sun Teague

The Pyramid by Sarama Sun Teague is a fictional narrative which was adapted for a live audience performance by Lucius Robinson at Dell’Arte International – School of Physical Theatre.

So there’s this Pyramid in my backyard I started building back in ’92.  Built it thinking that if shit goes down New Year’s Eve 1999, and aliens throw some thunder bolts and set the whole world on fire, this Pyramid might save my life.  But after I built it, I kinda forgot about it.  Never put anything in it other than a case of beer.  New Year’s ‘99 came and I spent it at some party in some kid’s basement, my Pyramid lonely and abandoned.  Same thing my ex-wife would tell me eighteen years later: I built the marriage and then abandoned her in it.  That’s what she called it—I call it paying bills—but I digress.  (Man…  back in ’92 though, the idea of marriage had never even took a flying shit on my horizon.  I was a free man, and my eyeline stretched from here to the edge of the world.)

So I built the Pyramid and forgot all about it until the other night when I ran out of alcohol.  Doesn’t happen much, but my check to the cable company bounced, which made some other shit go deficit, and the proverbial fountain ran the fuck dry.  No TV and no booze.  Damn.  It’s enough to make a man a dull boy.  But then I remembered: “Oh there’s a case of beer in the Pyramid that’s about—mmm—twenty-one years old right now!”  Twenty-one was about how old I was when I built the Pyramid, you know.  I was always a sharp hand with laying cement and knocking together boards, and I crafted this Pyramid like a veritable fucking temple.  Couldn’t really tell you where the idea for it came from; it was like a dream I had.  A message to get ready for 1999.

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Black Diaspora Literature of the 20th Century

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Born on May 19, 1925 in Omaha, Nebraska, Malcolm Little, who later became known as Malcolm X was an iconic figure of the Civic Right movement. The Autobiography of Malcolm X as Told Alex Haley includes intimate details about X’s life, from his days in Harlem, New York to life changing pilgrimage to Mecca.

As an African-American Muslim minister he became a human rights activist. His activism for people of color and his unabashed criticism of racism within America resulted in close surveillance by the United States government and the target of Black violence. On February 21, 1965, he was assassinated by Nation of Islam members Talmadge Hayer, Norman 3X Butler, and Thomas 15X Johnson. Before his death Malcolm had become a powerful voice for change in the Civil Rights movement.


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